Plagiarism?

Monday, May 5th, 2008 @ 10:52 pm | ripoff

Wikipedia defines plagiarism as:

Plagiarism is the practice of claiming or implying original authorship of (or incorporating material from) someone else’s written or creative work, in whole or in part, into one’s own without adequate acknowledgement.

Now, I’m sure most of you are wondering what in the hell I’m talking about. Well, I’m going to show you.

As most of you know, I’m an avid user and small contributor to the Slackware project. I use slackware-current quite a bit. In fact, its the main operating system I run on my laptop. Now, what does this have to do with anything you ask? Many know of the countless derivatives and cross-platform distributions out there that have taken from Slackware and created their own uniqueness in the world of Linux.

However, there are still some out there that choose to ignore the fact of credit where credit is due. I’m sure some of you will take this article to be yet another one of my so called “ramblings” about this certain distribution, but you’ll soon get over it. This isn’t a rambling; it is a statement of fact and shown proof of that fact. Either you can deal with it, see the light, and move on or you can go off and try to tag me as a vigilante with no cause for concern that is just bitching to bitch. Whatever you determine, I will be right ;)

Now, to begin, we all know about my first run of articles concerning Bluewhite64 and many had their own opinions based on mixed information or lack there of or just plain ignorance. This article is not to “call out” anyone, but to try and help reveal what I see as a major issue.

We know that Slackware just released 12.1. Now, I follow the change logs quite religiously. I also check up on Slamd64 and Bluewhite64 quite frequently. It helps me to gauge where everything is in the development process. With that said, I started noticing down right similarities between Bluewhite64’s changelog and Slackware’s changelog.

From Bluewhite64’s 12.1 ChangeLog:

Thu May 1 23:26:52 EEST 2008
Bluewhite64 12.1 RC4. The last RC? .
A software series/kernel-huge-2.6.24.5-x86_64-2.tgz: Patched to fix a security issue in
fs/dnotify.c. The use of dnotify (largely replaced by inotify on 2.6.x
systems) could lead to a local DoS, or possibly a local root hole.
This flaw will also be addressed in the kernels for previous releases
as soon as possible. The patch itself may be found in
source/k/linux-2.6.24.5-CVE-2008-1375-patch/. For additional information
(when the CVE candidate is opened), see:

http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2008-1375

All the kernel packages below should also be considered security fixes.
[*** Security fix ***]
A software series/kernel-test-huge-2.6.25-x86_64-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
A software series/kernel-modules-2.6.24.5-x86_64-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
A software series/kernel-test-modules-2.6.25-x86_64-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
D software series/kernel-headers-2.6.24.5-x86_64-2.tgz: Rebuilt from a patched source tree.
K software series/kernel-source-2.6.24.5-noarch-2.tgz: Patched (leaving dnotify.c.orig
for comparison and/or reverting to patch up to a newer kernel later).
L software series/svgalib_helper-1.9.25_2.6.24.5-x86_64-2.tgz: Recompiled.
EXTRA software/slackpkg/slackpkg-2.70.3-noarch-1.tgz: Upgraded to
slackpkg-2.70.3-noarch-1 (release ready). Thanks to Piter Punk! -:)
TESTING/packages/kernel-test/kernel-test-headers-2.6.25-x86_64-2.tgz:
Rebuilt from a patched source tree.
TESTING/packages/kernel-test/kernel-test-source-2.6.25-noarch-2.tgz: Patched (leaving
dnotify.c.orig for comparison and/or reverting to patch up to a newer kernel later).
kernels/huge.s/*: Patched and recompiled.
kernels/test.s/*: Patched and recompiled.
isolinux/initrd.img: Rebuilt with newly compiled kernel modules.
usb-and-pxe-installers/: Rebuilt usbboot.img with newly compiled kernel modules.

From Slackware’s 12.1 ChangeLog:

Wed Apr 30 20:36:48 CDT 2008
12.1 RC4. We think this should be the last one.
a/kernel-generic-2.6.24.5-i486-2.tgz: Patched to fix a security issue in
fs/dnotify.c. The use of dnotify (largely replaced by inotify on 2.6.x
systems) could lead to a local DoS, or possibly a local root hole. We said
we wouldn’t make changes now unless something was “critical” — and it seems
we got what we wished for. ;-) This flaw will also be addressed in the
kernels for previous releases as soon as possible. The patch itself may be
found in source/k/linux-2.6.24.5-CVE-2008-1375-patch/.
For additional information (when the CVE candidate is opened), see:

http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2008-1375

All the kernel packages below should also be considered security fixes.
(* Security fix *)
a/kernel-generic-smp-2.6.24.5_smp-i686-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
a/kernel-huge-2.6.24.5-i486-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
a/kernel-huge-smp-2.6.24.5_smp-i686-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
a/kernel-modules-2.6.24.5-i486-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
a/kernel-modules-smp-2.6.24.5_smp-i686-2.tgz: Patched and recompiled.
d/kernel-headers-2.6.24.5_smp-x86-2.tgz: Rebuilt from a patched source tree.
k/kernel-source-2.6.24.5_smp-noarch-2.tgz: Patched (leaving dnotify.c.orig
for comparison and/or reverting to patch up to a newer kernel later).
l/svgalib_helper-1.9.25_2.6.24.5-i486-2.tgz: Recompiled.
extra/linux-2.6.24.5-nosmp-sdk/: Updated SMP to no-SMP kernel source patch.
extra/slackpkg/slackpkg-2.70.3-noarch-1.tgz: Upgraded to
slackpkg-2.70.3-noarch-1 (release ready). Thanks to Piter Punk! -:)
kernels/huge.s/*: Patched and recompiled.
kernels/hugesmp.s/*: Patched and recompiled.
kernels/speakup.s/*: Patched and recompiled.
isolinux/initrd.img: Rebuilt with newly compiled kernel modules.
usb-and-pxe-installers/: Rebuilt usbboot.img with newly compiled
kernel modules.

With this section, you can see the direct copy and paste of the Slackware Changelog into Bluewhite64’s Changelog. Now, this may not seem to be a big deal to most, but to me this is someone being very very lazy. You didn’t do any of the work stated in that log. That was Pat. Piter Punkt didn’t help YOU with anything; it was Slackware. See where I’m going with this?

Lets move on to some more examples.

From Bluewhite64’s 12.1 Changelog:

Tue Apr 29 13:47:34 EEST 2008
This is Bluewhite64 12.1-RC3, no ISO for this time . Enjoy!
A software series/cups-1.3.7-x86_64-2.tgz: Applied patch str2790 to fix crash bugs in the PNG
image filter. The issues are not believed to be capable of either a DoS (at
worst, it simply crashes the filter processing the current job and does not
crash the scheduler daemon, which just moves on to the next job in the print
queue), nor arbitrary code execution (data from the image is never stored in
the affected tile array). Still, it seems to be worth fixing here just in
case. The CUPS bug report may be found here:

http://www.cups.org/str.php?L2790

AP software series/mysql-5.0.51b-x86_64-1.tgz: Upgraded to mysql-5.0.51b (which appears to be
nothing more than a version bump…)
L software series/imlib-1.9.15-x86_64-6.tgz: Patched to fix rendering issues on Intel and
possibly other graphics chipsets.
L software series/libmtp-0.2.6.1-x86_64-1.tgz: Upgraded to libmtp-0.2.6.1.
The udev rules are now sed processed during build.
L software series/libpng-1.2.27-x86_64-1.tgz: Upgraded to libpng-1.2.27.
This fixes various bugs, the most important of which have to do with the
handling of unknown chunks containing zero-length data. Processing a PNG
image that contains these could cause the application using libpng to crash
(possibly resulting in a denial of service), could potentially expose the
contents of uninitialized memory, or could cause the execution of arbitrary
code as the user running libpng (though it would probably be quite difficult
to cause the execution of attacker-chosen code). We recommend upgrading the
package as soon as possible.
For more information, see:

http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2008-1382

ftp://ftp.simplesystems.org/pub/libpng/png/src/libpng-1.2.27-README.txt
[*** Security fix ***]
X software series/xf86-input-joystick-1.3.2-x86_64-1.tgz: Upgraded to xf86-input-joystick-1.3.2.
X software series/xf86-video-vmware-10.16.1-x86_64-1.tgz: Upgraded to xf86-video-vmware-10.16.1.
XAP software series/mozilla-firefox-2.0.0.14-x86_64-2.tgz: Added the distribution
name and version to the User Agent (UA).
XAP software series/seamonkey-1.1.9-x86_64-1.tgz:Added the distribution
name and version to the User Agent (UA).
isolinux/initrd.img: Fixed minimum RAM amount in /etc/issue, and made some
edits to other documentation within the installer.
usb-and-pxe-installers/: In usbboot.img, fixed minimum RAM amount in
/etc/issue, and made some edits to other documentation within the installer.

From Slackware’s 12.1 Changelog:

Mon Apr 28 23:43:55 CDT 2008
We’ll call this Slackware 12.1 RC3, and freeze the tree for anything that
isn’t critical. Things seem very stable, so it’s probably a good idea to
save any further upgrades and additions until -current restarts.
a/cups-1.3.7-i486-2.tgz: Applied patch str2790 to fix crash bugs in the PNG
image filter. The issues are not believed to be capable of either a DoS (at
worst, it simply crashes the filter processing the current job and does not
crash the scheduler daemon, which just moves on to the next job in the print
queue), nor arbitrary code execution (data from the image is never stored in
the affected tile array). Still, it seems to be worth fixing here just in
case. The CUPS bug report may be found here:

http://www.cups.org/str.php?L2790

ap/mysql-5.0.51b-i486-1.tgz: Upgraded to mysql-5.0.51b (which appears to be
nothing more than a version bump…)
l/imlib-1.9.15-i486-3.tgz: Patched to fix rendering issues on Intel and
possibly other graphics chipsets. Thanks to Iain Paton.
l/libmtp-0.2.6.1-i486-1.tgz: Upgraded to libmtp-0.2.6.1. The udev rules are
now sed processed during build. Thanks much to Joerg Germeroth. :-)
l/libpng-1.2.27-i486-1.tgz:
Upgraded to libpng-1.2.27.
This fixes various bugs, the most important of which have to do with the
handling of unknown chunks containing zero-length data. Processing a PNG
image that contains these could cause the application using libpng to crash
(possibly resulting in a denial of service), could potentially expose the
contents of uninitialized memory, or could cause the execution of arbitrary
code as the user running libpng (though it would probably be quite difficult
to cause the execution of attacker-chosen code). We recommend upgrading the
package as soon as possible.
For more information, see:

http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2008-1382

ftp://ftp.simplesystems.org/pub/libpng/png/src/libpng-1.2.27-README.txt
(* Security fix *)
x/xf86-input-joystick-1.3.2-i486-1.tgz: Upgraded to xf86-input-joystick-1.3.2.
x/xf86-video-radeonhd-1.2.1-i486-1.tgz: Upgraded to xf86-video-radeonhd-1.2.1.
x/xf86-video-vmware-10.16.1-i486-1.tgz: Upgraded to xf86-video-vmware-10.16.1.
isolinux/initrd.img: Fixed minimum RAM amount in /etc/issue, and made some
edits to other documentation within the installer.
usb-and-pxe-installers/: In usbboot.img, fixed minimum RAM amount in
/etc/issue, and made some edits to other documentation within the installer.

I don’t think I even have to explain this section. If you can’t see the direct copy and paste.. get to the eye doctor.. get an examination, get glasses, then hit yourself on the head with a baseball bat because you are blind as a bat and dumber than a box of rocks.

The examples continue the entire length of the change log. I can post them all, but why? I’m posting this to bring an issue into the public eye that needs to be addressed. Yes, that is my opinion, that it needs addressed. Why? If you have to ask why, then you obviously do not understand the time and effort that the folks at Slackware put into a release. Yes, even maintaining the change logs is a full time job and takes time to write.

Once again, the display of no credit where credit is due is proven. Its in black and white. On a web page. Publicly available for all to see. Just in case something changes between now and when you read this, we know the Slackware change log will stay as-is. However, I’ve provided a pdf print out of the Bluewhite64 change log for 12.1 release as-is from the date of this post.

One more point to hit on. The release announcements.

From Bluewhite64’s release announcement for 12.1:

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you’ll find better support for RAID, LVM, and cryptsetup; a network capable (FTP and HTTP, not only NFS) installer; two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: KDE 3.5.9, the latest version of the award-winning K Desktop Environment, and Xfce 4.4.2, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop environment; SMP Linux Kernel 2.6.24.5 and 2.6.25.1 (for testing) with advanced features and performance; Fuse 2.7.3 and ntfs-3g 1.2310 read/write NTFS driver; SCIM 1.4.7 (Smart Common Input Method); an updated IA32 Emulation (run 32-bit programs) in the EXTRA software series, and may more improved and upgraded packages. Read the Official Announcement for more details.

From Slackware’s release announcement for 12.1:

Well folks, it’s that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.1! Since we’ve moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.1 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.0) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.

Among the many program updates and distribution enhancements, you’ll find better support for RAID, LVM, and cryptsetup; a network capable (FTP and HTTP, not only NFS) installer; and two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: Xfce 4.4.2, a fast, lightweight, and visually appealing desktop environment, and KDE 3.5.9, the latest 3.x version of the full-featured K Desktop Environment.

The official announcement has more details. Also please consider helping to support the project financially at http://store.slackware.com (the CD set and DVD are off to replication, but pre-orders are being taken now). Your kind support and the help of many volunteers is what makes this project possible. Huge thanks are due to everybody who pitched in and helped with bug reports, patches, testing, suggestions, other comments, and everything else. Without this valuable input, Slackware would be nowhere near what it is today. Special thanks to the CREW, to the people developing and testing for slackbuilds.org (where many of Slackware’s future additions are first built and tested), and to everyone on linuxquestions.org, various #slackware or ##slackware IRC channels, other Slackware related web sites, and other places where the community shares their needs and concerns with the team. On behalf of everyone here, thanks. We think you’ll enjoy this new release, and hope that you’ll find it to be much more than 0.1 better than Slackware 12.0. ;-)

Have fun!

Pat and the Slackware team

From what you can see, a good portion of it is copy and paste… lazy… lazy… lazy….

I rest my case.

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